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DSST Ethics in Technology Study Guide

Updated: Aug 18



Are you ready to study for your DSST Ethics in Technology exam?


If so, you came to the right place.


Please look at our study guide below to better understand what to expect on your exam.


Table of Contents

  1. Cyberspace and Privacy

  2. Domestic and International Security

  3. Legal Issues in Cyberspace

  4. Technological Innovation and Ethics

  5. Professional Ethics

  6. Conclusion

  7. Student Resources

  8. References


1. Cyberspace and Privacy


DSST Ethics in Technology Exam Outline. Cyberspace and Privacy – 21%-25%.
Cyberspace and Privacy – (21% - 25%)

Cyberspace


Cyberspace presents opportunities and challenges regarding privacy and security.


Individuals have unprecedented access to information and communications tools.


There are new risks associated with sharing personal information online.


Individuals need to be aware of both benefits and risks of cyberspace before deciding how much personal information to share.


Government Surveillance


Government surveillance is one of the most controversial issues regarding privacy in cyberspace.


While some argue that government surveillance is necessary to protect national security, others contend it infringes on citizens' privacy rights.


The debate is likely to continue, but in the meantime, individuals should be aware of the possibility that the government may monitor their online activities.


Corporations


It is important to note that corporations also collect and use personal data.


While some companies are transparent about using personal data, others are not.


As a result, individuals should exercise caution when sharing personal information online, even with companies they trust.



DSST Ethics in Technology Trivia Question #141



2. Domestic and International Security


DSST Ethics in Technology Exam Outline. Domestic and International Security – 20%.
Domestic and International Security – 20%

Domestic and International Regulations


To maintain secure communications between organizations, domestic and international security regulations must be followed.


This includes ensuring that all data is encrypted and that access to systems is restricted to authorized personnel only.


Additionally, regular security audits should be conducted to identify potential weaknesses in the system.


Collection and Use of Personal Data - National Security


The collection and use of personal data can be a vital tool in the fight against terrorism.


By analyzing data patterns, security agencies can identify potential threats and take steps to disrupt them.


However, using personal data can also pose a risk to civil liberties.


Any data collection efforts must be transparent and subject to rigorous oversight to strike a balance between security and privacy.


Hacking and Counter-Hacking


Hacking has become a serious threat to domestic and international security.


Hackers can gain access to sensitive information, which they can use for financial gain or carry out cyberattacks.


To combat this threat, it is vital that organizations invest in robust security systems and that they provide training for their employees on how to identify and prevent hacking attempts.


Information Warfare


Information warfare uses information and communication technologies to attack an adversary.


This can include jamming enemy communications, launching cyberattacks, or spreading disinformation.


While it can disrupt an adversary’s operations, it can pose a risk to innocent civilians.


Any information warfare operations must be conducted to minimize collateral damage.


Cyberterrorism


Cyberterrorism is using digital technologies to carry out terrorist attacks.


This can include disrupting critical infrastructure, stealing sensitive data, or spreading propaganda.


3. Legal Issues in Cyberspace


DSST Ethics in Technology Exam Outline. Legal Issues in Cyberspace – 21%.
Legal Issues in Cyberspace – 21%

Free Speech Issues


The free speech rights of individuals can be limited in cyberspace.


For example, the First Amendment does not protect hate speech and other forms of online harassment.


Additionally, some countries have enacted laws that criminalize certain types of online speech.


As a result, individuals must be aware of their country's speech restrictions before posting anything online.


Privacy Legislation and Industry Self-Regulation


The privacy of individuals is often not protected in cyberspace.


For example, many companies collect and sell the personal data of their users without their consent.


Additionally, some countries have enacted laws that allow the government to collect and store the personal data of its citizens.


To protect the privacy of individuals, it is essential that companies adhere to industry self-regulation standards and that countries enact strong privacy legislation.


Intellectual Property


The intellectual property rights of individuals can be violated in cyberspace. Pirated copies of movies, music, and software are widely available online.


Many websites allow users to post copyrighted material without the copyright holder's consent.


Governments enact strong copyright legislation, and companies prevent piracy by protecting individuals' intellectual property rights.


Lawful Access and Encryption


The lawful access rights of individuals can be limited in cyberspace.


For example, many countries have laws that allow the government to collect and store the personal data of its citizens.


Additionally, some companies encrypt their users’ data, which makes it inaccessible to law enforcement agencies.


To protect the lawful access rights of individuals, it is essential that countries enact strong privacy legislation and that companies take measures to ensure that their users’ data is accessible to law enforcement agencies.


Cybercrimes


Cyber crimes are crimes that are committed using digital technologies.


This can include hacking into computers, stealing data, or spreading malware.



DSST Ethics in Technology Trivia Question #244



4. Technological Innovation and Ethics


DSST Ethics in Technology Exam Outline. Technological Innovation and Ethics – 17%.
Technological Innovation and Ethics – 17%

Biotechnologies


The use of biotechnology to create new life forms raises concerns about the safety of these life forms and their potential to be used for nefarious purposes.


The Internet of Things


The Internet of Things can be used to spy on individuals and collect sensitive data.


Using the Internet of Things in critical infrastructure raises concerns about the potential for cyberattacks.


Robotics and Artificial Intelligence


The ethical implications of robotics and artificial intelligence are often debated.


For example, some argue that robots could be used to replace humans in dangerous jobs, such as military combat.


Additionally, using artificial intelligence in decision-making raises concerns about the potential for bias.


Autonomous Vehicles

Using autonomous vehicles raises concerns about the potential for accidents and the need for new regulations.


Autonomous vehicles could replace human drivers, leading to the loss of jobs.


Social Justice Issues


Using technology can exacerbate social inequality.


Additionally, using technology can raise concerns about the potential for discrimination.


5. Professional Ethics


DSST Ethics in Technology Exam Outline. Professional Ethics – 20%.
Professional Ethics – 20%

Moral Obligations, Legal Liability, and Accountability of Corporations


Corporations are responsible for protecting the environment and ensuring their products are safe.


The accountability of corporations raises concerns about the potential for corporate wrongdoing.


Moral Responsibilities of IT Professionals


The ethical implications of the responsibilities of IT professionals are often debated.


Some people argue that IT professionals protect users' data privacy.


Additionally, the responsibilities of IT professionals raise concerns about the potential for conflicts of interest.


The Role of the Press


Some people argue that the press is responsible for reporting the news accurately and without bias.


Additionally, the role of the press raises concerns about the potential for media manipulation.


Social Media, Positive Re-enforcement and Dissemination of Unfounded Information


Social media can be used to spread false information.


The use of social media raises concerns about the potential for cyberbullying.


Net Neutrality


Net neutrality is essential for a free and open internet.


The repeal of net neutrality raises concerns about the potential for discrimination by internet service providers.



DSST Ethics in Technology Trivia Question #438



6. Conclusion: DSST Ethics in Technology


In conclusion, the ethical implications of technology are debatable.


The topics listed in this exam outline are just a few of the many ethical issues relevant to technology.


As you prepared for the DSST Ethics in Technology exam?


If not, consider the daily ethical implications of the technologies you use and take a free practice exam.


You might be pleasantly surprised with your results.


Good luck and happy testing!


7. Student Resources


8. References


DSST Ethics in Technology Fact Sheet

DSST Ethics in Technology Fact Sheet
.pdf
Download PDF • 230KB

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